Posted in Daily Prompt, My Writing

The Leaf

God’s simple beauty, beyond compare

Nature’s bounty everywhere

So much to smell–so much to see

Let’s take the Stately Old Oak Tree

Six hundred species, big family and strong

but how do you prove that you really belong

Examine my LEAF said the Little Sprout

that will tell you what I’m all about.

One of these years I’ll drop an acorn

and be a hundred feet tall

but until then–I’ll show you my colors

they will be blazing–just wait until Fall!oak-791737_640

Posted in Daily Prompt, My Writing

The Crumb

The Little Mouse–Hiding in the house–

as hungry as he could be–

watched the young lady, eating her toast, laughing with such glee–

when all of a sudden a piece of  that toast landed on her knee, Yippee

 thought the Little Mouse while hiding in the young lady’s house–there is something here for me–

The speedy Little Mouse ran through the house,

capturing the crumb, on his little thumb,

and into the night ran he–

As he looked back at the young lady, still eating, and laughing with glee! 

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Posted in Church Messages

In His Time

Use Patience While Waiting For God

Ecclesiastes 3:1-8, 11

How many of us are guilty of wanting what we want, when we want it? I know most of us have dealt with this, most of us then, tired of waiting, make a decision that ends up being a mistake.

God knows what is best for us and will direct our lives to give us His best. Will you wait on Him?32905-low-res_1280x1280

Posted in Daily Prompt

The Gate

I just love to peek through a gate. What’s on the other side? I’m not a peeping Tom, but if there are flowers, shrubs and garden goodies in the yard, then I’m sure that there will be more on the other side of the fence.

Years ago my sister and I were on a vacation, happening upon Elvis’ home. It was not open to the public during that time and we saw all that we could by peeking through the gate. My sister got a brilliant idea to climb on top of the brick wall and get another view of the property. I helped her climb up, her shoe fell off into his yard. There was a dog barking and she didn’t want to take a chance to drop into the yard, grab her shoe and possibly not be able to get back over the fence. So, I’m sure Elvis enjoyed the wonderful present of my sister’s old stinky shoe.

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Posted in Tidbits of Information

Tidbit of Information 7/3

On July 3, 1835, in Paterson, New Jersey, children went on strike seeking a more equitable eleven-hour workday instead of the thirteen and one-half hours that they were currently working. They were also seeking a th-3six-day work week.

Paterson was the site of historic labor unrest that focused on anti-child labor legislation, and the six-month-long Paterson silk strike of 1913 that demanded the eight-hour day and better working conditions. It was defeated by the employers, with workers forced to return under pre-strike conditions. Factory workers labored long hours for low wages under dangerous conditions and lived in crowded tenement buildings around the mills. The factories then moved to the South, where there were no labor unions, and still later moved overseas.

Posted in Tidbits of Information

The Smithsonian

Smithsonian-MapTidbits of Information for June 27

The Smithsonian

On June 27, 1829, James Smithson, an English scientist died and left an endowment to the United States to found the Smithsonian Institution. It was established by an act of Congress in 1846.

A few years ago my sister and I was on vacation in Washington DC and loved our vacation there. I wish we could have seen more; there is so much to do and see in DC that you need at least a week if not more. We had three days there and missed many of the sights and most of the many places that make up the Smithsonian. This deserves another visit, and one day hopefully, we will get back there.

Posted in Tidbits of Information

Tidbits for Today-6/26

In 1721 Dr. Zabdiel Boylston vaccinated his six-year-old son and two servants against smallpox. These were the first vaccinations given for the disease in the United States.

  • Smallpox is a contagious disease caused by the variola virus.
  • Smallpox was the first disease to be eliminated from the world through public-health efforts and vaccination.
  • Smallpox still poses a threat because existing laboratory strains may be used as biological weapons.
  • Smallpox causes high fever, prostration, and a characteristic rash. The rash usually includes blister-like lesions that occur everywhere on the body.
  • Approximately one-third of people with smallpox died from the disease. Survivors were scarred for life. If the eye was infected, blindness often resulted.
  • There are new experimental medications that might be effective in smallpox, but these have not been tested in human cases since the disease has been eradicated.
  • The smallpox vaccine contains a live virus called vaccinia. It is administered by dipping a pronged piece of metal into the vaccine and then pricking the skin.
  • The vaccine has uncommon side effects that may be fatal, including infection of the heart and brain with the vaccinia strain. Serious side effects are more common with the initial vaccine and are uncommon with second doses.
  • The vaccine is currently only given to selected military personnel and laboratory workers who handle the smallpox virus.

Smallpox is thought to have existed for more than 12,000 years. Evidence of infection can be found in mummies from ancient Egypt, including the mummy of Ramses V. Smallpox entered the New World in the 16th century, carried by European explorers and conquistadors. Because the aboriginal inhabitants had no immunity to the disease, smallpox often decimated native populations. There are even reports where infected blankets were used to intentionally infect Native American populations in the 18th century — one of the early examples of biological warfare. During the 20th century, it is estimated that there were 300 million to 500 million deaths from smallpox worldwide, compared to 100 million from tuberculosis.
Currently, the risk factors are working in highly specialized laboratories that may still have smallpox viruses in storage by accident or become contaminated while either working with the viruses or using the viruses as a biological weapon. Continue Readingth-2